Tag Archives: Constellation

Three Publications from Sr. Mary Ellen O’Hanlon now Available Online

You can now read three publications of Sister Mary Ellen O’Hanlon (1882-1961), revered and renowned professor of botany at Rosary College in the mid 20th century.  Sister O’Hanlon focused her research on using “an enlightened, scientific approach to human differences to combat racism and prejudice” (Women Building Chicago 1790-1990, page 645), advocated for racial justice, and was very active in the civil rights movement.  Sister Diane Kennedy explains Sister O’Hanlon’s writing as extremely important in “guiding college students, workers and others toward the civil rights movement.” (Dominican Magazine Fall 2013, page 10.)

The three publications are:

Racial Myths
Somewhere there is recorded an Arabian proverb in which the author distinguishes three classes of human beings – “those who are immovable, those who are movable, and those who move.” This very terse and pithy classification of mankind does not coincide with the more popular but much less profound distinctions which are offered by the physical anthropologist; because a proportionate representation of all three of these classes, according to the Arabian philosopher, would undoubtedly be found in each of the various “races” or groups which are distinguished by the anthropologist. Because of their popularity and the exaggeration of their significance, these less fundamental and quite superficial distinctions designate but also confuse the meaning of the concept of race.

OHanlon_RacialMyths.png

The Heresy of Race
This booklet is designed to answer some of the current questions which are almost certain to be asked whenever the subject of race relations is proposed. The reception of RACIAL MYTHS and the continuous call for it from many types of organizations, institutions and individuals seem to indicate that this sequel to it will meet a similar response and may be of some help to the many sincere souls who are rightly disposed toward social justice and Christian charity.

OHanlon_HereseyofRace

Three Careers: Highlights and Overtones
Introduction by Sister Benvenuta Bras, O.P.: Sister Mary Ellen O’Hanlon, a member of the Rosary College faculty during the first 30-some years of its existence existence, a demanding professor of botany, was well-known in college and professional circles. Characteristic were her imperious bearing, her confident statements of opinion, her strong and perhaps domineering manner, and with that, her friendly and engaging personality. Members of the Rosary faculty knew her well. Yet for many of our younger sisters, her name means only a prayer on the list of our deceased sisters. I expected to find therein data for a “curriculum vitae,” with appropriate dates, lists of publications, professional memberships and possibly some correspondence, and, in her obituary, an account of her last days. What I did find changed my plans completely. Sister Mary Ellen left a typed autobiography, THREE CAREERS, clearly intended for publication. My astonishment and delight increased exponentially as I read, and I knew at once that her own presentation was infinitely superior to any summary I could make. Therefore the following pages offer THREE CAREERS as she wrote it, beginning with a table of contents and a list of illustrations for her proposed work.

OHanlon

 

Al-Jazeera America Contributions by Dominican History Professor Now in Constellation

Constellation, Dominican’s digital repository of scholarship, now contains the full run of History Professor David Perry’s contributions to Al-Jazeera America.  Perry’s pieces are mainly about people with disabilities and related policy and media issues, such as portrayal of people with disabilities on television and police conduct toward the mentally and physically disabled.

Al-Jazeera America stopped its TV and online news services last month.  Though its web site still exists, providing archival content for the last 3 years, Perry’s work was saved in Constellation to guarantee future access should the web site be taken down entirely.  Having the work in Constellation also adds to Perry’s prestige as a public academic (he is a regular contributor to CNN, The Atlantic, and other news outlets) and strengthens Dominican’s scholarly reputation.

Perry’s Al-Jazeera America work can be found in the RCAS Faculty Scholarship community in Constellation.

Constellation logo inverted

Honors Distinction Projects

Four outstanding seniors completed distinction projects this year in the Mazzuchelli Honors Program.  Their projects are archived and made available through Constellation, our online repository of University scholarship.  We recognize how hard they’ve worked all year and congratulate them on completion of their projects.  Follow the links below to read the projects.

The Connection Between Ethnicity, Motivation, and GPA
Wojtach, Paulina (Clinical Psychology Major)
There are a number of factors found to predict grade point average (GPA), including parental attachment, college self-efficacy, and ethnic background (Aguayo et al., 2011; Dennis et al., 2005; Vuong et al., 2010; Yazedijan et al., 2009). Some evidence suggests that college self-efficacy mediates the relationship between parental attachment and GPA, but that the relationship is specific to white students (Yazedijan et al. 2009). The current study examines whether the relationship is specific to all white students, including Eastern European first-generation college students, and whether it generalizes to Hispanic first-generation college students. The proposed hypothesis, that parents affect GPA indirectly by influencing college self-efficacy, and that the effect differs by ethnic background, was not supported by the results; only the correlation between college self-efficacy and GPA was significant for the student sample as a whole. The possible reasons for the null findings are discussed.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Bipolar I Disorder in Children, Adolescents, and Adults: A Comparative Analysis
Nicole Fledderman (Neuroscience Major)
Previously known as manic depression, bipolar disorder was once thought to occur rarely in children and adolescents. However, between 1994 and 2003 there was a 40-fold increase in the number of U.S. children under the age of 20 diagnosed with bipolar disorder. This drastic rise is a cause for concern for several reasons. Specifically, despite the fact that there are important differences in the way bipolar I disorder presents in pediatric and adult populations, the current diagnostic and treatment guidelines in children and adolescents are largely based on and similar to those for adults. This study compares and contrasts standard diagnostic criteria and pharmacological treatment guidelines for bipolar I disorder in adult and pediatric populations and suggests guidelines for a re-evaluation and improvement of diagnosis, a process which requires conducting more careful and targeted research into bipolar I disorder in children and adolescents.

“Unoccupied”: An Illustrated Poetry Project
Gabrielle Lehmann (Painting and Psychology Major)
Note: Access to this project is restricted because of plans for future publication.
“Unoccupied” is the title of a year‐long exploration in poetry and illustration. Presented as a series of eight detailed prints, this project integrates writing and visual art into a cohesive narrative. Each visual borrows inspiration from traditional printmaking techniques, carried forward into a modern digital format that ties old art styles to the modern day.

Testing the Life- span of Caenorhabditis elegans using Sulfur- containing Compounds
Dalal Abuaqel (Neuroscience Major)
Aging is an unavoidable, universal, and biological phenomenon affecting all multicellular organisms. Although different hypotheses have been put forward to explain the cellular and molecular mechanisms of aging, recent studies have made it progressively clear that it is indeed possible for organisms to have an increase in life span through pharmacological intervention. This study is focused on investigating the interaction of genes controlling the rate of aging in wild type and DAF-16 Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) strains in order to understand the mechanisms of aging that could uncover new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of age related disease. In this work, I report that exposing C. elegans to sulfur-containing compounds increases the lifespan of C. elegans. These compounds work through a mechanism independent of insulin-like signaling and are not involved in increased resistance to free radicals.

Partnership with Business School to share faculty research

The student loan crisisThe mortgage crisisSocial responsibilityBusiness education.

These are just a few of the areas in which faculty in Dominican’s Brennan School of Business are doing research and publishing.  The library began a partnership with BSB to archive those faculty publications and make them widely available in our online repository of scholarship, Constellation.

We’ve already uploaded over 20 peer-reviewed journal articles, and will continue uploading all eligible articles from the last five years from all faculty members.

If you’re looking for a specific faculty publication, or doing your own research on areas in which BSB faculty are experts, try Constellation.  The articles are easy to access and free to you.

Constellation logo inverted

Rebecca Crown Library Excellence in Research Awards

Design by Kelsey Keithly, class of 2017
Design by Kelsey Keithly, class of 2017

Apply for the first annual Rebecca Crown Library Excellence in Research Awards: http://research.dom.edu/researchawards.

The awards recognize excellence in scholarly or creative written papers or projects that demonstrate quality and in-depth use of Rebecca Crown Library resources and services.

All Dominican University undergraduate and master’s students enrolled in at least one class for the fall 2015 semester and/or the spring 2016 semester, including students who graduate in December 2015, are eligible.  Papers and projects submitted for consideration must have been completed for credit courses or Dominican-sponsored research programs (such as the Undergraduate Summer Scholar Program) during the summer 2015, fall 2015 or spring 2016 semester.

All applicants must write a short (up to 750 words) essay in which s/he demonstrates her/his originality, depth, breadth, and sophistication in the use of Library resources and services; ability to select, evaluate, synthesize, and utilize Library resources in the creation of a scholarly or creative written paper or project; and personal or professional growth through the acquisition of newfound knowledge.

Winners must agree to give the Library permission to publish winning papers and projects in Constellation, Dominican’s online repository of scholarship.  Access to projects that are part of ongoing scientific research intended for future publication will be restricted to you and the Constellation administrator.

Winners must also present a summary of their research at the Library Excellence in Research Awards ceremony on Monday April 18, 2016.  The time of the ceremony is TBD, but will likely be 5:00pm.

One undergraduate student and one master’s student will receive a first place award.  One undergraduate student and one master’s student will receive an honorable mention award.

First Place:
$250
Publication of research in Constellation
Recognition at the Library Excellence in Research Awards ceremony on April 18, 2016
Bookplate dedication in library book of student’s choice

Honorable Mention:
$50
Publication of research in Constellation
Recognition at the Library Excellence in Research Awards ceremony on April 18, 2016
Bookplate dedication in library book of student’s choice
Applications due April 11, 2016

Online application

Questions?  Email libraryawards@gmail.com.