On This Day: President Lincoln was Fatally Shot

Almost 150 years ago today on April 14, 1865 President Abraham Lincoln was fatally shot by John Wilkes Booth, a Confederate advocate, during a play at Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C. Suspicions have been that John Wilkes Booth fatally shot President Lincoln in response to the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee during the American Civil War at Appomattox Court House Virginia five days earlier.

This was not the first attempt however to demise President Lincoln.  The previous plan was to capture President Lincoln on March 20, 1865, to bring back to the Confederate army, while visiting the Boston areas however on the plotted kidnapping day President Lincoln was not present. In desperation to save the Confederacy, upon learning that President Lincoln was going to attend the “Our American Cousin” performance at Ford’s Theater, Booth formulated a plan to assassinate not only Lincoln but Vice President Andrew Johnson and Secretary of State William Seward in anticipation to send the U.S. government into chaos mode.

On April 14, the plan went into action and Secretary of State Seward was seriously wounded by Lewis Powell, however George Atzerodt was suppose to assassinate Vice President Johnson but when push came to shove he backed out of the plan and fled. In the meantime, Booth fatally shot President Lincoln in his theatre box with only a single bullet in the back of his head, and escaped Washington thereafter on horseback.

The following day at 7:22 a.m. President Lincoln was declared dead, making him the first United States President to be assassinated.

Image from: http://loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3b49830/

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